Priority Setting And Conservation of Migratory Waterbird Species at Key Coastal Wetland Sites in Ghana (AEWA Small Grants Fund 2011)

The project aims at establishing waterbird population trends, through analysis of over 20 years of waterbird count data, as well as determining changes in habitat conditions through analysis of demographic data for the Sanderling (Calidris alba). The Sanderling breeds in the highest Arctic (which is susceptible to the effects of global warming) and relies on shoreline habitats (which are under stress from sea level rise), thus making it a unique model for understanding the changing environment. These analyses will permit the re-definition of key wetland sites and buffer sites and the results will permit well-informed advocacy for their protection and adaptive management under protected climate change scenarios and impacts on coastal wetlands. The project will also advocate for enhanced management of designated Ramsar Sites and protection of additional key sites.

Activities include completing the data entry process and updating already-entered data; training personnel on techniques for long-term population counts and survival analyses and use of relevant software; completion of Sanderling survival data collection; conducting studies on Sanderling feeding ecology at selected sites; preparing a policy document on the current status of Ghana’s coastal wetlands for use by the Ghana Wildlife Division; organizing two information workshops to inform representatives from the local and national government on waterbirds and wetlands.

No pictures for Priority Setting And Conservation of Migratory Waterbird Species at Key Coastal Wetland Sites in Ghana (AEWA Small Grants Fund 2011)


Implementing AgencyCentre for African Wetlands (CAW) at the University of Ghana

Taxonomic groupBirds
Target regionAfrica
Final technical reportNo

No related threats

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